On 28 July 2010, through Resolution 64/292, the United Nations General Assembly explicitly recognized thehuman right to water and sanitation and acknowledged that clean drinkingwater and sanitation are essential to the realisation of all human rights. … It is a prerequisite for the realization of other human rights”.May 29, 2014

But even before that, earlier, about one thousand five hundred years ago, Allah the Sublime assured us (Humankind) of the following.

‘It is provided for thee that thou wilt not hungertherein, nor wilt thou be naked.

And thou will not thirst therein, nor will you be exposed to the elements…. (20:119-120)

The provision of water therefore, among other things, was guaranteed by the Glorious Quran. Yet, as indicated above, it is only a few years ago that the international body of nations recognized water as a fundamental human right.

Lacking potable water is indeed a violation of our fundamental human right. This is an evil of huge proportion and has the potential of causing great harm. The first casualty of this horrendous problem will be the health of the population. The transfer of communicable diseases will ravage the country and further stretch our already beleaguered health sector.

 

The catastropic consequences can range from a sick population, which is the workforce of any nation – the engine of the economy which will drastically dwindle, and fast. God help us all if our economy is unable to withstand any further lashing from an inflated medical bill from our hospitals.

The horrible unending queuing for potable water in the country in the past few days – coming to weeks – is a cause for concern. The National Water and Electricity Company seems unable to solve their seemingly perennial problem of supplying water and electricity constantly. What is being done about this?

The Gambia is such a small country that it is unfathomable that our government cannot even provide this basic need. Isn’t it time that the government started looking for other solutions as far as the same old system has repeatedly failed us?

 

Can we consider privatisation and see if that is the way to go? It is futile trying to do something the same way for fifty-two years with no result and we are still adamant and persistently repeating the same method. It is time to start thinking outside the box!

These are extraordinary circumstances and thus need extraordinary measures. We must be willing to do the unthinkable so as to be rid of these perennial woes. This needs strong leadership which is not afraid to take the hard unpopular decisions.

 

Have a Good Day Mr President….

 

Tha Scribbler Bah

A Concerned Citizen